Myths About Diamonds 2

1. A LAB GRADED DIAMOND MUST BE A GOOD DIAMOND.

I can’t even count how many jewelry stores I’ve gone in to and asked a jewelry salesperson if a particular diamond is good, only to hear, “Sir it must be good it has been graded by Laboratory XYZ! And only the best diamonds in the world can come with this lab grading report!” Give me a break, any lab anywhere in the world will grade and any diamond sent to them. Pure bred or rabid dog it doesn’t make a difference to them. The labs just want their fee.

2. AN IDEAL CUT DIAMOND IS IDEAL.

In the 1960’s jewelers would toss around the term “perfect” like they were passing out candy: “Sir, this is a perfect diamond.” “Ma’am, this is a perfectly fine diamond.” Or, “Heck, this diamond is just plain perfect!” The FTC eventually stepped in and said the term was just plain misleading. Jewelers argued that they should have the right to call anything perfect that was perfect in their opinion.

They were overruled; the FTC passed a guideline that said only a D Flawless well cut diamond could brandish the label of “Perfect”. The jewelers changed their pitch. Forty years later we are hearing the same thing: “Sir, this is an ideal cut diamond.” “Ma’am, this is an ideally fine diamond,” and finally, “This diamond is exactly cut, it is ideal!” Only one problem, FTC hasn’t stepped in yet. And until they do there will be over 100 interpretations of ideal. But don’t be fooled, it’s easy to identify the scammers. They are the ones that insist that total depths can exceed 61% for rounds and non-rectangular fancies.

They are the ones that insist on tiny tables for Rounds and giant tables for Emerald Cuts. They insist that these measurements are ideal, and I guess in some respects they are ideal in increasing the weight of the diamond so their bottom line goes up. Want Ideal? Be more specific and ask what class of cut a diamond is. In that arena there are hard and fast rules.

3. GREAT SYMMETRY EQUALS GREAT PROPORTIONS.

For the most part symmetry refers to the arrangement of the facets on the diamond, length to width ratios, out of roundness and inline culets. Symmetry excellent or otherwise does not infer great proportions or the relationship between crown and pavilion angles. If any salesman tries to imply that just because the symmetry on the lab grading report is good or better means it must be a well-proportioned stone it’s time to leave.

4. ONLY A DIAMOND CAN CUT GLASS.

There are a numerous of things that can cut glass. From synthetic diamonds to glass itself. Anyone who suggests that the best way to prove a diamond is real is to rub it against glass should have their head examined. This wives’ tale should stay just that.

5. A JEWELER WILL TEND TO MOUNT HIS BEST DIAMONDS IN READY TO GO SETTINGS

On the contrary, a jeweler will always premount his worst diamonds in settings. That way he can hide any chips under prongs and make it impossible for you to get an exact color and weight measurement. Always remember a jeweler’s best diamonds are in his safe and the only way to see them is to ask for them to be brought out.

by Fred Cuellar, author of the best-selling book “How to Buy a Diamond.” More questions? Ask the Diamond Guy®